Can Beagles Live In Apartments?


Who doesn’t love a Beagle!? They are cute and friendly, and who can resist those adorable ears? But with their reputation as energetic hunting dogs who like to bark and bay, you might wonder if a Beagle could live successfully with you in your apartment. It turns out there’s a lot to learn about Beagles living in small spaces. 

Can Beagles Live In Apartments?

Yes. Many people live happily with their Beagles in apartments. Beagles are small with short coats that are easy to maintain. They are even-tempered and loyal. They are eager to please and can be trained to live comfortably in an apartment. 

They are energetic, but they also enjoy resting and spending time with their people.

Beagles are great, but if you live in an apartment, you will have to do things differently than someone with a house with a yard. In this post, we will go over some of the challenges of living with a Beagle in an apartment.

Challenges of Living in an Apartment with a Beagle

Some challenges come with bringing a dog into a small living space. Here are a few things you should think about before bringing a Beagle home and some ideas for apartment living that will create a happy and fulfilling life for both you and your new friend.

Size

Beagles are a great size for apartment companions, standing 13 to 16 inches tall and weighing 20 to 25 pounds. Their short coat is easy to maintain, and they typically live a healthy 12 to 15 years. 

Temperament

Beagles are often described in breed standards as “merry.” What a happy word and an accurate description of the Beagle temperament. Most Beagles are friendly and cheerful, neither aggressive nor shy – great little companions! They can be excitable and energetic, but Beagles like to rest. They won’t have to be exercised to the point of exhaustion before they want to chill with you in your apartment.

Should I Purchase a Beagle Puppy or Adopt From a Rescue?

I recommend that you find a reputable breeder to know you have a healthy Beagle that will have a long lifespan. Rescue Beagles are wonderful, but they can have health problems and die young like one of mine did.

Many potential dog owners struggle to decide whether to purchase a Beagle puppy from a breeder or adopt an older dog from a rescue organization. There are advantages (and challenges) to both decisions.

There is nothing cuter than a Beagle puppy, with its long ears, silky fur, and beautiful eyes. And there are advantages to choosing a young puppy over an older dog. One of the advantages is that your puppy can be socialized early on. 

Living in an apartment without your own yard makes it more difficult to house train a Beagle puppy.

Until their immunizations are completed, puppies must be “paws off the ground” in public areas. You can’t take them outside because they are vulnerable to deadly illnesses like Parvo that other dogs may have left behind. Pee pads or grass mats need to be used until their immunizations are finished. 

This adds to the challenge of house training a young puppy while living in an apartment. Of course, puppyhood passes, and you may decide that starting with a puppy is very much worth the extra effort, the most rewarding choice for you.

Rescue Beagles, dogs that have usually passed the puppy stage, come with unknown histories. Dogs with difficult pasts may need extra time for you to figure out what they need to thrive and then tend to those needs. It takes up to three months for a rescue dog to decompress and feel like they belong. With time and patience, though, most issues can be resolved, and you will have a loyal and loving friend for the rest of his life.

On the plus side, older dogs often arrive house-trained and sometimes even crate-trained. They would likely settle happily into the companionship and comfort of your apartment, bonding quickly to the kind new friend who took them in.

Does the Size of My Apartment Matter?

As long as your Beagle is exercised once or twice a day, has room inside to play, and is provided plenty of mental stimulation, the size of your apartment shouldn’t matter. 

No backyard? No problem. By taking advantage of dog parks, going for walks, and visiting doggy daycares, your Beagle will have plenty of exercise. Playtime with other dogs will help him behave when at home in an apartment.

House Training

One way to help your Beagle get used to taking bathroom breaks outside the apartment is to start by taking them out every hour, then every two hours, then every three. Eventually, your adult Beagle should be able to be left for 6 to 8 hours at a time. Of course, making arrangements to get them outside mid-day would be best.

Crate Training

Some owners find that they can let their Beagle have the run of the house. At the same time, they’re gone, but sometimes Beagles (or any dogs) can get separation anxiety and act out by chewing your favorite shoes or the edge of the sofa. They are pack animals, and Beagles especially are very loyal and connected to their humans. They miss you when you’re away.

Making their crate a friendly and comfortable place and using it when you leave your apartment solves two problems. It eliminates the possibility of destructive behavior, and it provides a safe den for them, reducing their anxiety. 

I learned this from a veterinarian when my dog was getting tummy aches from separation anxiety. Kennel’s training solved the problem. In fact, she would retreat to her kennel on her own whenever she needed some downtime.

Will Barking and Baying be a Problem with a Beagle Living in my Apartment?

Beagles have a lovely singing voice, which your neighbors may not appreciate in an apartment setting. Several training methods use positive reinforcement to teach your Beagle not to bark and bay inside. 

One owner I know trained her dog to whisper. She rewarded him with treats each time he barked very softly, and at the same instant, named the sound, saying “whisper.” 

After a few weeks, she could command him to whisper at any time, which was a very cute trick to show her friends. He also had permission to bark inside, as long as he whispered. Outside, he was encouraged (at appropriate times) to bark at will. 

This taught him that barking outside was allowed, but whispering inside was the only barking behavior awarded with treats. It became a game for him and another tool in his owner’s toolbox for helping her dog live successfully in a small apartment.

Mental Stimulation

It’s a good idea to have a basket or other designated place in your apartment for your Beagle’s favorite toys. You can also provide treat-filled Kongs, and slow-feeding pet bowls from time to time so they will learn to chew their own toys and leave your furniture and shoes alone. 

Another way to keep your Beagle happily engaged is to give them simple commands throughout the day. They can “sit,” “lie down,” or “fetch a toy” while you’re making dinner or working on the computer. 

Socialization

Socializing your Beagle will make sure they feel happy and secure whenever you take them on outings away from your apartment. It’s important to start introducing your Beagle to other people and dogs at a young age, if possible. 

You can do this by walking them through the neighborhood and providing friendly interactions with other dogs and their owners, taking them with you to dog-friendly stores, visiting enclosed dog parks, and inviting neighbors with friendly dogs to join you for playdates. 

Consider seeking or creating a Meetup group for Beagle owners. Your dog will enjoy playtime while their people get to know other humans who love Beagles as much as you do.

Outdoor Safety For Beagles 101

Behind all that cuteness lies a very intelligent little dog with amazing skills. Beagles are scent-hounds. Once your Beagle picks up a scent, it will follow it to its end. You can call and call them, but they won’t give up the hunt. 

They aren’t disobedient, so don’t get frustrated with them! Single-mindedly following a scent is their superpower! It’s what they were bred to do. 

Keep your Beagle safe from wandering by microchipping them, attaching your contact information to their collar, and by leashing them whenever they are not in a fenced area. There are also small GPS tracking devices that can be attached to their collar so you can track them using an app on your cell phone. 

Final Thoughts

Can Beagles live in apartments? Yes! Beagles make great companions. With the right information, positive reinforcement, patience, and love, you and your Beagle can share many years of fun and companionship together in your apartment home. 

Andrew

I am a dog trainer and passionate about canine health and behavior problems. I train dogs of all ages but specialize in training dogs with behavioral issues such as aggression or anxiety. My favorite part of my job is watching the transformation that takes place when an owner starts to understand their pet’s needs and how to meet them.

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