Everything You Need to Know About the Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix


Great Pyrenees beagle mix

The Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix is a hybrid dog that has the appearance of both beagles and Pyrenees. They are rare and not a popular designer dog.

They are sometimes found in shelters but occasionally may be bred on purpose.

It’s essential to know what makes them different before bringing one into your home.

We’ve compiled a guide about this unique hybrid so you can make an informed decision about whether this canine companion is right for you!

Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix Overview

The Great Pyrenees Beagle mix is exactly what its name suggests, a crossbreed of the short-haired hunting hound and one of the world’s most majestic dog breeds. The breed shares some similarities with both parents and has its own unique features like a coat to withstand cold climates. However, their traits are unpredictable.

The breed is not recognized by any major kennel club. Still, they have been around for quite some time, with their first documented appearance in 1881.

They were initially bred as an experimental hunting dog, since both parent breeds are working dogs. The Beagle is a scent hound that excels at tracking while the Great Pyrenees is an active sporting dog.

Great Pyrenees, on their own, may not be able to withstand the vigors on the field. They don’t have as much stamina as the Beagle does.

Some of the Beagle & Great Pyrenees hybrids may have positive qualities from both parents and be used for hunting.

Young Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix Puppy

Qualities From Their Parent Breed

Beagles are among the most popular breeds for families because they love cuddling and playing. They’re also intelligent, full of energy, and have a strong sense of smell! They are a very social breed that thrives when they can spend time with people and other dogs.

Pyrenees Mountain Dogs are also intelligent, full of energy, but they are different. They are very loyal to their family but can be wary around strangers or other animals they don’t know well enough. They are more independent and some can be aloof.

The mix between the two breeds is rare. If you happen to have one you are one of few. Please share your experience with us in the comments!

The nice thing about the Great Pyrenees Beagle mix is that it has the potential to inherhit the best qualities from both breeds. Even though, thats not a guarantee for all.

Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix Temperament

Young Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix Puppy

Even though the parent breeds are different, the Great Pyrenees Beagle mix will inherit a temperament mixture from both parent breeds.

It’s helpful to understand both parent’s breeds’ history and temperament. Your mutt will likely have a personality that is a combination of both.

The Great Pyrenees, bred to be independent and stubborn in their own right, are not a dog that is going to sit on your lap. Your mix might inherit this trait.

They were initially bred as sheepdogs so they can spend all day out there with the flock without any human contact – but some of them might still want you for company now and then.

Beagles on the other hand, love to cuddle, and NEED to be touched. They want to be with their family wherever they co. They are more co-dependant.

Beagles, historically, have been bred to be hunting dogs. They excel at this because of their intense sense of smell, as they are in the hound family.

They can smell things miles away, much further than non-hound dogs. They are often to used to track criminals, rabbits, rats, and deer.

They are even used to find truffles that grow underground!

A Beagles nose is so strong many pest control companies use them to find bedbugs in a home.

Which traits will your Beagle & Great Pyrenees mix inherit?

Whichever parent has the stronger genes. Unfortunately, this can be highly unpredictable. Mixed breeds don’t always inherit one set of personality traits. Both parents play a role in the qualities passed on.

Anyone that makes as-a-matter-of-fact statements about this mixed breed does not understand what they are talking about.

It’s imperative you understand both parent breeds and decide for yourself which traits your mix has inherited and which he hasn’t.

Socialization

Beagle

A Pyrenees Beagle mix is a dog that may need to be around people if the Beagle’s personality is more prominent. If this is the case, they will be friendly and affectionate dogs with good social skills.

They will make excellent pets for active families that have the time to dedicate to them. The gentle nature of this breed makes it good for kids.

Both parent breeds are the same in this regard so it’s possible to predict.

However, if left alone for extended periods, this mix will likely become destructive. Again, if the Beagle traits are more dominant.

They may chew furniture and bark excessively because of separation anxiety – don’t let your pup suffer from boredom isolation!

The Great Pyrenees, not an aggressive dog breed. However, they are still territorial and will need to be socialized early on in their lives with other dogs of all shapes, sizes, breeds. This applies to your mix as well, especially if he leans more to the Great Pyrenees.

The Great Pyrenees beagle mix may not be a good choice for a new dog owner as both parent breeds can be stubborn and higher maintenance.

Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix Appearance

Their appearance will depend on the genetics of the parent that has the more dominant gene.

Their size and coloring will also vary, but you can expect them to be medium to large-sized dogs with long, fluffy fur that sheds. They will likely have an undercoat.

The Great Pyrenees is usually white or cream in color, while the Beagle’s coat can vary from black and tan all of the ways up through browns into red hues. They’re often spotted too.

Their appearance will depend on which parent has more dominant genes. This is unpredictable. It’s hard for breeders to make accurate predictions.

Size of the Beagle & Great Pyrenees Mix

Beagles and Great Pyrenees are different in size.

Beagles are small to medium-sized dogs, while the great Pyrenees is a large breed of dog.

While there has been very little research done on this mix, it’s hard to say what an average height would be for these types of breeds when mixed together.

One PyaBea mix owner shared on Reddit that he was around 25-30 inches at withers (which sounds about right).

if you have on, let us know the size in the comment!

Exercise Needs

Great Pyrenees

The Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix is an energetic breed! It needs a lot of exercise and has substantial activity requirements. This is due to the parent breeds sharing this quality.

They will likely need at least 30 minutes of brisk walks per day, and another 30 minutes should be dedicated to interactive playtime.

Their activity levels will be almost without bounds during the first few months of life!

They would also require mental stimulation, which can be provided by teaching advanced tricks and new commands.

If you want to teach your mix basic obedience and advanced tricks, check out smart dog training.

Training a Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix can take time and patience.

Not Good For Apartment Living

The Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix will likely prefer to be outdoors in the wintertime if it inherits it’s coat from the Great Pyranees.

They probably won’t be good for apartment living and will need space in either a house or yard where they can roam freely and explore.

This is especially true if they inherit the Beagle’s sense of smell. They will need a lot of outdoor activity if this is the case. Smells stimulate them, and they need this.

Their double-layered coat will protect them from cold weather, which means they may like spending time outside in the cold. You might have trouble keeping your pooch indoors on days when it’s chilly outside!

The opposite is also true. He may not do well in hot weather. Ensure he has plenty of water and doesn’t spend too much time outside on hot days to prevent him from overheating.

Grooming

The Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix has a medium-length double coat fur that does require regular grooming. But, they still hardly need to be groomed as often as other dog breeds.

Both the Beagle & Great Pyrenees have similar grooming requirements.

They will need to be brushed at least once every two weeks and bathed at least once every 1.5 to 2 months.

Feeding

Their medium to large size and energetic lifestyle will amp up their diet requirements, so you’ll want to select high-quality food for your Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix.

Beagles love eating so much that it can lead them into obesity quickly if you’re not careful with their food intake. This trait may pass onto your dog, so be on the lookout for overeating and weight gain.

The Beagle Pyrenees Mix will likely inherit a delicate stomach, which makes eating only the best food critical.

Changing foods and introducing different textures to your dog’s diet too often could cause an allergic reaction or digestive issues.

Which is not exactly pleasant for anyone involved. You can avoid this by taking some precautions.

Once you begin feeding him a particular type of dog food, and he gets used to it. Be sure to stick with it unless he has a reaction.

Health

Great Pyrenees

Health Concerns of the Great Pyrenees Beagle Mix Dog Breed: The average lifespan for a Great Pyrenees beagle mix is 12-14 years, based on their parent breeds.

They are prone to some health problems, such as hip dysplasia and epilepsy. Still, they can also inherit these conditions from their parents or grandparents.

Some breeders believe in a hybrid vigor theory, which is the idea that a mixed breed will have fewer health problems than either of its purebred parents.

Many other breeders disagree and say that it’s not a good idea to mix two breeds because it can lead the dog to have more health problems.

The best way to determine health problems is to look at the parent breeds and assume your mix could have a mixture of both.

4 common health conditions

Eye problems: Cataracts & glaucoma.

Both parent breeds are prone to eye issues. It’s more common in these mixes because of their shared genetics with both parent breeds.

They’re also at a higher risk when dealing with certain types of medications like steroids, leading them to blindness if not monitored closely by vets.; this condition will usually be seen around age two years old, so make sure you have your dog. Checked out before then!

Heart problems.

Both breeds are prone to heart issues, but it’s more common in these mixes because of their shared genetics with each other. Something to keep an eye on if you have a Beagle Pyrenees mix!

Hip Dysplasia

This is an issue in both breeds and should be monitored.

Hip dysplasia, or hip joint disease as it is also known, occurs in large and giant dogs’ breeds.

Hip Dysplasia causes the hip joint to slip out from its socket; if this happens a lot over time, it will eventually cause deterioration of the bone cartilage around your dog’s hips, leading to complete loss of function for their joints.

It can be painful but can be treated by surgery in some cases. If surgery isn’t an option, then it can be managed with pain medication.

Skin allergies

The Great Pyrenees beagle mix is prone to skin issues and can have a hard time with topical treatments like shampoos or ointments because of their sensitive coat; they’re also more likely than most dogs when it comes down to food sensitivities which may lead them to dermatitis if not monitored closely by

Cost of Ownership

Not many people breed Pyrenees Beagles together. It’s considered unethical by certain breeders. So finding one is rare.

A pup’s cost can range from $400 to upwards of $1200. The price will depend on where you live and what breeder is available in your area.

You may be able to find one from a shelter, which I recommend. There aren’t too many people breeding this mix. It’s often unintentional.

Final Thoughts

Well, hopefully, you understand the characteristics of the beagle Pyrenees mix. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments!

Andrew

I am a dog trainer and passionate about canine health and behavior problems. I train dogs of all ages but specialize in training dogs with behavioral issues such as aggression or anxiety. My favorite part of my job is watching the transformation that takes place when an owner starts to understand their pet’s needs and how to meet them.

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